Developing into an effective Polish Teacher of English

Developing into an effective Polish Teacher of English

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The major aim of this work has been to explore the profile of an effective Polish teacher of English ten years ago and now. In particular, it has attempted to determine what competencies or kinds of professional knowledge distinguish this successful professional, as well as what personal teacher theories she seems to hold. In order to accomplish these goals, two interview studies were conducted, one almost a decade ago and the other recently. The results of the analysis of different spheres of an English language teacher’s professional competences may have significant implications for teacher education in Poland, and make it possible to identify these characteristics of the teacher that can foster their effective performance of the job. On a more general level, they also enable us to make some recommendations concerning the optimum preparation of potential candidates for becoming teachers of foreign languages in Poland. Due to the focus of this study, the tentative model to be presented here pertains to a profile of the effective language teacher in Poland. It is also important to keep in mind that the guidelines the present model offers are not necessarily applicable to another context, but to the Polish context at a time when the Polish educational system is still being affected by sweeping institutional and curricular changes.


Liczba stron152
WydawcaWydawnictwo Naukowe Akademii Pomorskiej w Słupsku
ISBN-13978-83-7467-163-7
Numer wydania1
Język publikacjipolski
Informacja o sprzedawcyRavelo Sp. z o.o.

Ciekawe propozycje

Spis treści

  INTRODUCTION    9
  CHAPTER 1. A REVIEW OF STUDIES ON EFFECTIVE TEACHING    11
    Introduction    11
      1.1. The beginnings: the concept of good practice    11
      1.2. The concept of successful teaching    13
        1.2.1. The behaviourist approach    13
        1.2.2. The cognitive approach    14
        1.2.3. The communicative approach    15
        1.2.4. The humanistic approach    16
        1.2.5. Current concepts of successful teaching    17
      1.3. Major studies of effective teachers    19
        1.3.1. Highet’s qualities of a good teacher    20
        1.3.2. Good teachers’ characteristics in Okoń’s articles on teacher personality    20
        1.3.3. Taylor’s study    22
        1.3.4. Teacher qualities identified by Ryan    22
        1.3.5. Flanders’ styles    23
        1.3.6. Bohucki’s study of teacher personality    23
        1.3.7. Rosenshine and Furst’s correlates of effective teaching    24
        1.3.8. Pupils’ expectations of teachers – Nash’s study    25
        1.3.9. Achievement of objectives by effective teachers    25
        1.3.10. Bloom’s list of effective teachers’ classroom practices    26
        1.3.11. Ericksen’s essence of good teaching    26
      1.4. Effective language teacher studies    27
        1.4.1. Moskowitz’s analysis of outstanding teachers’ behaviours    27
        1.4.2. A good teacher’s qualities as perceived by young adolescents    28
        1.4.3. Politzer and Weiss’s research    29
        1.4.4. Komorowska’s research on factors conditioning success and failure    29
        1.4.5. Sanderson’s project on good language teachers    30
        1.4.6. The need for change – Hawley et al.’s research on the effective teacher    31
        1.4.7. Some contemporary studies of good language teachers    32
        1.4.8. Effective language teacher studies – a summary    35
      1.5. Studies of poor language teachers    36
      1.6. Concluding remarks    38
  CHAPTER 2. A PROFILE OF A LANGUAGE TEACHER’S PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCES    39
    Introduction    39
    2.1. Linguistic competence    40
      2.1.1. Language proficiency    40
      2.1.2. Subject matter knowledge    45
    2.2. Methodological competence    47
    2.3. Psychological competence    49
    2.4. Pedagogical competence    51
    2.5. Normative competence    52
      2.5.1. Interactive knowledge    53
      2.5.2. Causal knowledge    53
    2.6. Experiential competence    55
    2.7. Contextual competence    57
    2.8. General competence    58
    2.9. Teacher knowledge – a summary    60
    2.10. Teacher competences vs. human wisdom    61
    2.11. Concluding remarks    64
  CHAPTER 3. TEACHERS’ PERSONAL THEORIES    65
    Introduction    65
    3.1. Fundamental concepts and approaches    65
      3.1.1. A transmission approach    66
      3.1.2. A constructivist approach    66
      3.1.3. Teacher Development Approaches    67
    3.2. Definition of personal theories    68
      3.2.1. The term    68
      3.2.2. Definitions of the term    69
      3.2.3. Teachers’ personal theories: an overview    74
      3.2.4. Teachers’ personal theories characteristics    76
    3.3. Sources of teachers’ personal theories    77
      3.3.1. Teachers’ own experience as language learners    77
      3.3.2. Personality factors    78
      3.3.3. Research-based teaching principles    79
      3.3.4. Principles derived from an approach or method    80
      3.3.5. Established practice    80
      3.3.6. Experience of what works best    81
      3.3.7. Origins of language teacher beliefs – a summary    81
    3.4. Language teacher beliefs    82
      3.4.1. Beliefs about language    82
      3.4.2. Beliefs about curriculum    83
      3.4.3. Beliefs about learning    84
      3.4.4. Beliefs about teaching    85
      3.4.5. Beliefs about the language teaching profession    93
      3.4.6. Teacher beliefs – a summary    94
    3.5. Metaphors as an aid to understanding teacher personal theories    95
      3.5.1. Advantages of metaphor    95
      3.5.2. Metaphors in teacher beliefs    96
      3.5.3. Metaphors – a summary    105
    3.6. Concluding remarks    106
  CHAPTER 4. THE EFFECTIVE FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER – NTERVIEWS    107
    Introduction    107
    4.1. Selection of teachers for the study    107
    4.2. The objectives    109
    4.3. The technique of data collection    109
    4.4. Analysis of the data    111
    4.5. Interview    111
      4.5.1. Interview 1    112
      4.5.2. Interview 2    116
      4.5.3. ME as an effective teacher: the ‘change’ aspect    124
      4.5.4. The profile of ME as an effective at present    133
    4.6. Concluding remarks    133
  FINAL REMARKS AND CONCLUSIONS    135
  BIBLIOGRAPHY    138
  APPENDICES    149
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